Everyone’s a Yannis

Always could believe all the things you tell to me
Always could believe the advice you give
Every day I bless the day you started to guide me
But lately, baby, I wonder if you’ve gone too far.
These days, everyone’s a Yannis, that’s the truth.
Giving advice is such a thrill. But sometimes it’s not right.

(with apologies to Errol Brown and Hot Chocolate … and Bootsauce)

“Everyone’s a Yannis.” What’s the truth? What does it mean?

Viral epidemics are no joke. We need to take them seriously. And many business leaders are struggling for a response. So it is no surprise that they turn to their strategic advisers for guidance.

Here at Archetypical, we have identified five types of strategic advisers. They are best explained via the analogy of a restaurant (click here for more details):
• Yannis the Yelper who provides the solution immediately.
• Martha the Maître d’ who is responsible for your overall experience.
• William the Waiter who takes orders.
• Salma the Sommelier who engages you in a chat about ‘solutions’.
• Christiane the Chef who is the technical expert you may never meet.

Many HRBPs and communication professionals complain that they are put into William roles, relegated to the job of order-taking and not adding value beyond telling managers (customers) what the soup of the day is.

Lately, though, we are seeing a surge of the Yannis archetype: advisers who feel that their role is to ‘instruct’ or ‘tell’. A ‘Yannis’ always knows best and positions themselves as the expert: he or she ‘knows’ the right solution. For example, here are some recent posts in my Linkedin feed:
• 5 Communication tips on how to deal with Covid-19.
• 10 ways HRBPs can reassure employees about Coronavirus.
• How to be productive while working at home.
• A checklist for employee communications around Coronavirus.
• Check out our blog to effectively lead during and after the outbreak.
• etc.

A Yannis is a good person to have by your side in a crisis. He or she will always have the answer and help you short-cut a complicated process; removing doubt and uncertainty. Sometimes it is helpful to have the decision taken away from you; let Yannis do the work – do what he says and you won’t go wrong.

A Yannis backed up by expertise is even better. When a medical professional appears on TV and plays Yannis; you will get reassurance and clear instructions.

However, there is a downside.

The challenge of the Yannis role is that s/he doesn’t know anything about your context, your circumstances, the specific situation of your organization, or your culture. When everyone’s a Yannis, you never can explain what’s happening to you.

As a Yannis, it is very tempting to blurt out the answer and share your ideas, but the challenge is that you might not be taken seriously because your advice is not helpful given the specific situation. Because s/he doesn’t take the receiver’s specific situation into account, there is a risk that Yannis gets side-lined and the advice is relegated to ‘noise’. For example, we all know to treat on-line hotel or Yelp reviews carefully and think for ourselves when deciding which reviewer (which Yannis) to listen to.

If you decide that Covid-19 constitutes a crisis for your organization, then Yannis can make a contribution. But if, on the other hand, you are still in the ‘taking precautions’ or ‘prevent’ phase then maybe you need Salma the Sommelier instead.

Salma – like all good wine waiters – operates quite differently from Yannis. She has equal (if not better) expertise but instead of telling the customer immediately what wine ‘solution’ to have (“here is my list of 10 wines you must have”), she’ll have a conversation and help you determine the best response, taking into account your specific context and requirements. She might have the checklist in her head but rather than blurting out the whole thing like Yannis would, she’ll guide you to one or two best answers for your business. Just like a sommelier will help you choose the right wine for you.

As strategic advisers, our ‘win’ is when leaders or clients listen and act on our advice. The challenge is to frame your advice in the best way to create success. Sometimes it is right to play Yannis. But there are other times when you need to play a different role.

Enter Salma.

“When everyone’s a Yannis, it’s no joke.
But baby, it’s amazing how wonderful it is,
when the roles we like to play can often change.”

Notes from Amsterdam: Where was the strategic adviser?

André Manning

Guest post from André Manning.

Editor’s note: a version of this blog, in Dutch, originally appeared here, the blog of the Logeion, the Dutch association for communication professionals.

One of the most challenging roles during my career in communications has been the Trusted Adviser one. And I guess it might be the same for many of my colleagues. In my view this is because this role goes beyond the technical skills of the communications professional. Being a trusted adviser is about the ability to influence your internal stakeholders (eg. the executive board) with the right communications advice to support the long-term organizational objectives. It is about the key characteristics of an executive management role, which can be quite challenging. The right coaching by peers or training during management development programs might certainly be of help. Though I have to admit that the time spent on this topic during these training programs is still relatively limited. This is why projects like Corporate Snakes and Career Ladders are so interesting: they give people the chance to practice what it is like to be a Trusted Adviser.

During my international career at companies such as Royal Philips, Booking.com or Amcor I played this role most of the times successfully. But honestly, sometimes I was wrong or there was at least room for improvement. Most of the times it was fun to be consulted as a Trusted Adviser. But there have been occasions it was only fun afterwards! And while in the beginning of my career gut feeling or the use of descriptive data was enough to convince my peers nowadays the use of prescriptive data or evidence-based research is becoming more important.

The challenges of the Trusted Adviser role were demonstrated once more when my wife and I were watching the Dutch 8 O’ Clock news recently. During one of the items a commercial director of a holiday resort was interviewed about a recent two-day teacher strike in the Netherlands. The commercial director proudly stated that he and his organization had cleverly responded to the fact that many parents had to make a virtue of necessity. Because teachers went on strike on both Thursday and Friday, parents were obliged to take time off work. They had to find a solution to entertain their children in – for example – an indoor ice rink park, a commercial playground or a holiday park. And the “smart” commercial director that I am talking about, was convinced (or was it greed?) he could make some extra money easily by raising the prices of a long weekend at his resort.

After all, he argued, these parents (and their children) would come anyway. In the same news-item, other entrepreneurs, with a different view, were interviewed as well. They had not given in to the sudden opportunity and chose for the opposite; they reduced the prices of their amenities.

I can’t help it, but I can’t get this news-item out of my mind. Not only as a consumer but also as a communications professional. What drove this man’s decision? And why did he choose to appear on the 8 O’Clock news to talk about it with pride? And was there a communications professional who advised him to do so?

Believe me, I am not against market forces, but I still think that I would have done things differently as an entrepreneur. And more importantly, I also would have taken another business decision into account as a trusted communication adviser. I’m still puzzled and don’t understand why the manager of the holiday resort didn’t go for the opposite and meet those parents who were hit by the teachers’ strike. Why didn’t he choose to make a special offer to the parents impacted; to show empathy and understanding (which is so important in communications) instead of focusing on short-term profit maximization? And… where was his “trusted adviser” in this case?

As we all know, a communications adviser is expected to be able to play multiple roles. And one of the most difficult roles as I said in the beginning of this blog, is the one that in management literature and practice, is called “the Trusted Adviser”.

The Trusted Adviser role is also the one where you sometimes have to stick your neck out. Or, as Dutch emeritus professor Cees van Riel (who is still working within the Reputation Institute) once said, “dare to risk your position”. Now, back to the example I mentioned earlier. I am curious what you would have done in this case, what would you have advised the commercial manager of the holiday resort. And do you feel equipped well with the right advisory or management skills to do so? I’m curious to hear your thoughts.

Andre Manning has had communications leadership roles within Royal Philips, AkzoNobel, Booking.com and Amcor amongst others. Currently he is the director of Logeion, the Dutch association of communications professionals, with more than 4,200 individual members. Logeion members work both at profit as well as non-profit organizations, communications agencies and as individual consultants. You can find him on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Feature image credit: commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Amsterdam-IMG_0051.JPG